Mozambique News Agency

AIM Reports


No.389, 5th November 2009


 

Contents

  • Guebuza and Frelimo win landslide victory
  • Official Provincial Results
  • Victory for Simango in Beira
  • Renamo defeated in Maringue
  • Renamo threatens a return to war
  • Holland finances higher education
  • Japanese aid for education
  • Brazil finances forestry centre
  • North-South highway to be rehabilitated by 2012
  • 260,000 may need food aid
  •  


    Guebuza and Frelimo win landslide victory

    President Armando Guebuza and Frelimo have convincingly won Mozambique’s presidential, parliamentary and provincial elections that were held on 28 October. The provisional results show that President Guebuza has won over 75% of the vote, with Renamo’s Afonso Dhlakama receiving 15% and Daviz Simango of MDM just under nine per cent.

    These provisional results were announced on 2 November, but work is continuing to inspect every one of the hundreds of thousands of votes declared invalid at the polling stations.

    The latest results, from 11,357 of the 12,699 polling stations (89.4%), were as follows:

    Presidential election
    Armando Guebuza
    2,624,564
    76.3%
    Afonso Dhlakama
    513,746
    14.9%
    Daviz Simango
    303,585
    8.8%

    The turnout was a few percentage points higher than in 2004 - but this still means that less than half the registered electorate voted.

    The electoral machinery ran smoother than in 2004. The vast majority of polling stations opened on time, and there were very few reports of polling stations without a voter register or with the wrong register.

    In the 2004 presidential election, 699 results sheets (5.4% of the total) were excluded from the 2004 final figures - many because they had been stolen en route from the polling stations to the district and provincial capitals. This problem does not seem to have recurred, and the electoral bodies are confident that they will process the overwhelming majority of the sheets.

    Three international observer missions have praised the running of the elections, but have expressed concerns what they consider to be a lack of transparency over some decisions that were made.

    The Election Observer Mission from the SADC (Southern African Development Community) Parliamentary Forum on 31 October issued an interim statement concluding that the elections held “were a true reflection of the will of the people of Mozambique”.

    The Forum consists of parliamentarians from SADC countries from both ruling and opposition parties, and is independent of SADC governments. Its observer mission consisted of 50 parliamentarians and staff members from nine SADC member states. This was the third time the Forum has observed Mozambican elections.

    Reading the statement, the mission’s leader, David Matongo of Zambia, said that the political environment for the elections was characterized by “a relatively high degree of tolerance and peace among the contesting political parties and voters”, and “the atmosphere was largely conducive to the freedom of expression and of assembly”.

    The mission found that on the whole the Electoral Administration Technical Secretariat (STAE) was prepared for the elections, and except for a few isolated cases, the election materials were distributed on time. However the mission called for improved access by the public to the voters’ roll.

    As for media coverage, the mission found it “relatively balanced”, and declared that the Mozambican media “is not subject to undue restrictions”.

    But, like the observer missions from the Commonwealth and the European Union, the Forum criticized the National Elections Commission (CNE) for not sharing information in good time “through consultation with stakeholders, especially political parties on the procedures, processes and requirements of nominating candidates at all levels, so as to minimize instances of excluding parties from contesting”.

    The CNE claims that it was the disorganisation of the parties themselves that led to the exclusion of their lists from some or all of the 13 constituencies. But observer missions suggest that the CNE did not make it fully clear to parties what was required, and what irregularities in documentation could be corrected.


    Official Provincial Results

    Nampula

    Presidential election

    Armando Guebuza
    386,375
    68%
    Afonso Dhlakama
    156,438
    27%
    Daviz Simango
    31,494
    5%
     
    Parliamentary election
    Frelimo
    382,812
    65.6%
    Renamo
    156,438
    23.4%

    Nampula has 45 parliamentary seats, and applying the d'Hondt system of proportional representation to the results, Frelimo will receive 32 seats and Renamo 13. The Nampula turnout was 39%.

    Zambezia

    Presidential election

    Armando Guebuza
    270,892
    54.3%
    Afonso Dhlakama
    193,956
    38.9%
    Daviz Simango
    33,719
    6.8%
     
    Parliamentary election
    Frelimo
    278,908
    55.4%
    Renamo
    197,518
    39.1%

    This gives Frelimo 26 of 45 seats, with Renamo picking up the other 19. The turnout was just 33%.

    Inhambane

    Presidential election

    Armando Guebuza
    233,090
    86.5%
    Afonso Dhlakama
    15,526
    5.8%
    Daviz Simango
    20,809
    7.7%
     
    Parliamentary election
    Frelimo
    207,989
    82.4%
    Renamo
    18,991
    7.5%
    MDM
    4,780
    4%

    15 of Inhambane’s 16 seats will go to Frelimo, and just one to Renamo. The Inhambane turnout was 46.8%.

    Sofala

    Presidential election

    Armando Guebuza
    168,282
    Afonso Dhlakama
    72,978
    Daviz Simango
    84,127
     
    Parliamentary election
    Frelimo
    164,415
    Renamo
    72,482
     
    MDM
    75,306

    Of the 20 seats for Sofala 11 will be occupied by Frelimo, five by the MDM and four by Renamo.

    Cabo Delgado

    Presidential election

    Armando Guebuza
    285,423
    80.1%
    Afonso Dhlakama
    50,621
    14.2%
    Daviz Simango
    20,097
    5.6%
     
    Parliamentary election
    Frelimo
    276,423
    81.1%
    Renamo
    50,165
    14.7%

    This result will give Frelimo 19 of Cabo Delgado's 22 seats, leaving only three for Renamo.

    Gaza

    Presidential election

    Armando Guebuza
    356,221
    95.7%
    Afonso Dhlakama
    3,451
    0.93%
    Daviz Simango
    12,278
    3.3%
     
    Parliamentary election
    Frelimo
    352,896
    96.9%
    Renamo
    5,106
    1.4%

    On this result, Frelimo wins all 16 of Gaza's parliamentary seats.

    Manica

    Presidential election

    Armando Guebuza
    182,306
    Afonso Dhlakama
    57,929
    Daviz Simango
    19,621
     
    Parliamentary election
    Frelimo
    180,698
    Renamo
    64,206

    As a result there will be 12 deputies from Frelimo and four from Renamo.

    Maputo City

    Presidential election

    Armando Guebuza
    285,947
    80.4%
    Afonso Dhlakama
    16,858
    4.5%
    Daviz Simango
    54,020
    15.2%
     
    Parliamentary election
    Frelimo
    268,654
    76.5%
    Renamo
    18,511
    5.6%
    MDM
    57,017
    16.2%

    As a result Frelimo takes 14 of the 18 parliamentary seats, with MDM taking three and Renamo one.

    Maputo province

    Presidential election

    Armando Guebuza
    241,308
    86.1%
    Afonso Dhlakama
    11,823
    4.2%
    Daviz Simango
    27,078
    9.7%
     
    Parliamentary election
    Frelimo
    242,257
    Renamo
    21,250
     

    As a result Frelimo take 15 of the 16 parliamentary seats

    (Tete and Niassa provinces have not yet released their results).


    Victory for Simango in Beira

    In the city of Beira, the only major urban area in the country that Frelimo did not win, the city's mayor, Daviz Simango, leader of the MDM, had a victory of around 10,000 votes over President Guebuza. Dhlakama trailed a humiliating third in a city that was once regarded as a Renamo stronghold. The results were:

    Presidential election
    Armando Guebuza
    49,553
    42.4%
    Afonso Dhlakama
    7,789
    6.7%
    Daviz Simango
    59,548
    50.9%

     


    Renamo defeated in Maringue

    Renamo also suffered a defeat in its former stronghold in the district of Maringue, in the central province of Sofala.

    Maringue housed the headquarters of the apartheid-backed Renamo rebels in the closing years of the war of destabilisation. After the end of the war and its transformation into a political party, Renamo kept an iron grip on Maringue. In the first multi-party election, in 1994, Renamo refused to allow other parties, particularly Frelimo, to campaign in the district.

    The result was that, in 1994, Frelimo won only 156 votes in Maringue, while Renamo took 14,939. But now that free political activity, as well as economic development, has come to Maringue, the Renamo vote has collapsed. President Guebuza took 84% of the vote.

    Presidential election

    Armando Guebuza
    11,056
    Afonso Dhlakama
    1,756
    Daviz Simango
    225
     
    Parliamentary election
    Frelimo
    10,971
    Renamo
    1,769
     
    MDM
    61

     


    Renamo threatens a return to war

    Former guerrilla fighters of Mozambique’s main opposition party, Renamo, have threatened to regroup in their old bases in the northern province of Nampula, unless the general elections are annulled.

    Renamo’s leader, Afonso Dhlakama left Maputo for Nampula on 29 October, and his immediate declaration, speaking to reporters at Nampula airport, was that “Mozambique will burn”.

    Now men claiming to be former Renamo fighters have gathered at the Renamo provincial office in Nampula city, with an ultimatum, giving the electoral bodies 72 hours to annul the elections – or they would return to their old bases in the bush to launch what they called “a rebellion against the Frelimo government”.

    They also demanded the dissolution of the Electoral Administration Technical Secretariat (STAE), the electoral branch of the civil service, which they described as “an instrument of Frelimo”.

    There were about 300 of them outside the office, and they claimed that these bases are in the regions of Muecate, Namaita, Lalaua, Murrupula, Mogovolas and Mecuburi.

    They claimed that this was their own decision, and said they were not interested in whether or not the Renamo leadership agrees with it. Some even accused Dhlakama of being in league with Frelimo.

    The Renamo Nampula spokesperson, Arnaldo Chalaua, said that this was a “provincial decision”, but might be extended throughout the country, since Renamo militants are revolted by “electoral frauds”. Renamo has not yet given any detailed explanation of the frauds it is referring to: the former guerrillas merely claimed that many people had been unable to vote because their names were not on the voters’ roll.

    Asked about this at the weekly police press briefing in Maputo, the spokesperson for the police general command, Raul Freia, said “we are not concerned with political statements, but with aspects of public order and tranquillity in the country”.

    He noted that opposition parties are quite entitled to demonstrate peacefully. “Demonstration is also a right enshrined in the law”, said Freia. “Now we are waiting for the announcement of the results. Then there will be the period for appeals, for those who do not agree with the results, all on the basis of the law”.


    Holland finances higher education

    The Mozambican and Dutch governments signed an agreement in Maputo on 2 November under which a Dutch grant of €14 million ($20.7 million) will be used to strengthen reforms under way in Mozambican higher education.

    The agreement, valid for three years, was signed by Education Minister Aires Ali and Dutch Ambassador Frans Bijvoet.

    Among the programmes under way in higher education, said Ali, was implementation of a system of accumulation and transfer of academic credits, a university accreditation system, and the general improvement of quality in university level bodies.

    These reforms, he said, seek to enable Mozambique to compete on a footing of equality at regional and international level.


    Japanese aid for education

    The Mozambican Education Ministry and the Japanese government signed an agreement in Maputo on 27 October, under which Japan will grant $10 million for the construction of four new secondary schools in the southern provinces of Maputo and Gaza.

    Signing the agreement were Education Minister Aires Ali, Japanese Ambassador Susumo Segawa, and the representative of the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA), Masami Shukonobe.


    Brazil finances forestry centre

    The Mozambican and Brazilian governments signed an agreement on 27 October for the rehabilitation of the Machipanda Forestry Centre (CEFLOMA) in the central province of Manica.

    Budgeted at $2 million, the programme will be implemented over three years. It envisages the acquisition of equipment, the installation of a plant nursery with the capacity of 100,000 saplings a year, and the construction of a new sawmill.

    The agreement was signed by Mozambican Education Minister Aires Ali and Brazilian ambassador Antonio de Sousa e Silva,

    Implementation of the Forestry Centre will involve the Education Ministry and the country’s oldest University, the Eduardo Mondlane University (UEM). Their partners on the Brazilian side are the Brazilian Cooperation Agency (ABC), and the Federal University of Parana.


    North-South highway to be rehabilitated by 2012

    The 2,500 kilometres of Mozambique’s main north/south highway, linking Maputo and Pemba, capital of the northern province of Cabo Delgado, will be fully rehabilitated by 2012.

    The new bridge over the Zambezi River, between Sofala and Zambezia provinces, inaugurated in late August, was a key step in improving the road.

    The final stretches to be upgraded are right at the start of the road, between the Maputo suburbs of Jardim and Benfica, from Xai-Xai to the resort of Chissibuca, between Massinga and Nhachengue, in Inhambane, Save and Muchungue, in Sofala, and Chimuara and Nicoadala, in Zambezia.

    The work on some of these stretches is already underway, while others are pending the conclusion of the necessary engineering studies.

    Other roads to be upgraded include the route between the port of Nacala and Nampula, and between Lichinga and Cuamba, the two main cities in the northernmost province of Niassa. The road from Lichinga to Montepuez in Cabo Delgado will be upgraded, which will give Niassa easy access to the port of Pemba.

    Mozambique has about 30,000 kilometres of classified roads, of which only between 6,000 and 7,000 kilometres are tarred.


    260,000 may need food aid

    The National Disasters Management Institute (INGC) estimates that about 260,000 people may suffer from food insecurity in various parts of the country up until the next harvest, in March/April 2010.

    Pockets of hunger persist, despite a generally good 2009 harvest. Problems exist in Cabo Delgado, which suffered floods, and Inhambane, Gaza and Maputo, which experienced prolonged dry periods.

    Other problems include high food prices, the reduction in migrant remittances, chronic diseases, and the reduction in sources of income.

    A source in the World Food Programme (WFP) said that $6.3 million are required to assist those in need. Currently, the source added, only 20 per cent of the 177,000 people identified as in need of assistance up to October are receiving aid. But as from November, another 72,000 people were added to the list of those requiring food aid, because their stocks of food had run out.

     


     

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